Badasses of History

Pretty much what it says. Badass people throughout history.

whoufflesoufflegirl:

the-treble:

willowpedia:

crazymolerat36:

ewitsmichelle:

not just followers, everyone.

same

I’m here if any of you need to talk<3

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The best part is, this post actually does something, it offers support, unlike one of those useless “reblog if you care” posts.

(Source: cali4niadreaming, via obscuruslupa)

British glider troops at Normandy (as part of Operation Deadstick) with a new friend and a new German motorcycle. The trooper at the far left has also captured a MP-40.

British glider troops at Normandy (as part of Operation Deadstick) with a new friend and a new German motorcycle. The trooper at the far left has also captured a MP-40.

blackhistoryalbum:

1918 photograph of Vernon Coffey and Virgil McNeal in France - 806th Pioneer Infantry Regiment, 2nd Army, AEF. (National WWI Museum)

blackhistoryalbum:

1918 photograph of Vernon Coffey and Virgil McNeal in France - 806th Pioneer Infantry Regiment, 2nd Army, AEF. (National WWI Museum)

bag-of-dirt:

Two Canadian soldiers, accompanied by a local French woman, guard two German Wehrmacht soldiers captured at the Battle of Caen. Fought between 6 June 1944 and 6 August 1944, the Allies initially aimed to take the city, one of the largest cities in Normandy, on D-Day. Caen was a vital objective for several reasons. Firstly, it lay astride the Orne River and Caen Canal; these two water obstacles could strengthen a German defensive position if not crossed. Secondly, Caen was a road hub; in German hands it would enable the enemy to shift forces rapidly. Thirdly, the area around Caen was relatively open, especially compared to the bocage country in the west of Normandy, ideal for construction of an airfield. The battle did not go as planned for the Allies (primarily Canadian and British forces), instead, dragging on for two months as German forces devoted most of their reserves to holding the city. Caen, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France. August 1944.

bag-of-dirt:

Two Canadian soldiers, accompanied by a local French woman, guard two German Wehrmacht soldiers captured at the Battle of Caen. Fought between 6 June 1944 and 6 August 1944, the Allies initially aimed to take the city, one of the largest cities in Normandy, on D-Day. Caen was a vital objective for several reasons. Firstly, it lay astride the Orne River and Caen Canal; these two water obstacles could strengthen a German defensive position if not crossed. Secondly, Caen was a road hub; in German hands it would enable the enemy to shift forces rapidly. Thirdly, the area around Caen was relatively open, especially compared to the bocage country in the west of Normandy, ideal for construction of an airfield. The battle did not go as planned for the Allies (primarily Canadian and British forces), instead, dragging on for two months as German forces devoted most of their reserves to holding the city. Caen, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France. August 1944.

(via fuckyeahcanadianforces)

"Contrabands" (runaway slaves) employed by the Union Army, 1863. Culpepper, Virginia

"Contrabands" (runaway slaves) employed by the Union Army, 1863. Culpepper, Virginia

French soldier or &#8220;poilu&#8221; as they were commonly called. Western Front of WWI, unknown date.

French soldier or “poilu” as they were commonly called. Western Front of WWI, unknown date.